Marble-Cake Federalism And Health Care Reform

health_care_providers_385x261

In the midst of civil and uncivil protests against any type of reformist action on the medical insurance corporations and their stranglehold over health care options in the United States there has been a proposed amendment to the bill that I feel best represents the embodiment of liberty and American Values.

The Kucinich Amendment proposes that the federal option remains intact but each state would be allowed to elect into a single-payer system if they chose to do so.

66332-marble-cake
We live in a system of government called Marble-cake Federalism where the federal government and state governments share powers over specific matters.

The best example being the issue of Gay-Marriage and the nature of how each state can decide for itself at this point if it is a legal practice or not, but if a federal law were to pass that either granted or denied the right to all citizens of the nation that would be nationwide legal practice from that point forward.

By granting a public option and in the same motion granting the state’s powers to establish a single-payer model is the best representation of Progressive Reformist action.

I would grant a lot more credit to the protestors of recent days to their commit to their cause and their willingness to do what it takes to heard, except for the facts that the values of non-violent protest seems to lost on far too many of their numbers and that the outright falsehoods coming from their mouths.

If there is a complete absence of logic and desired direction in any movement then ultimately there is one course in it’s direction: violence.

I understand a person if they speak about their fears about over reaching government powers into our lives. But I’m more interested to talk about The Patriot Act and The Homeland Security Department than I am to talk about a bill moving through Congress.

When the same group of people remained mute or even in support of expanding federalism when George W. Bush did it and then shout down their own representatives when they come to speak it becomes clear that some certain number of these people are just the most perverse of political partisans.

We the people do indeed need to find a way to take back the massive expanses in federal and executive powers but lacking a clear message beyond obstructionism of any government action regarding health care reform I am left to question the very motives of these protestors at their very core.

I also believe it to be true that a certain number of these people are paid-provocateurs working for the for-profit insurance agencies in order to make it appear that a vast majority of people support monopolies over the availability of health care in America.

Advertisements

The Challenges of Democracy

I find that I am personally challenged by the system of democracy and free debate over social issues. The unrestrained freedom of speech is the only vessel by which democracy can be rightly enacted. However, this atmosphere often allows for disingenuous and hateful rhetoric to spread like wildfire in a political landscape that allows for mass trickery.

The recent issue of President Obama’s address to Notre Dame sparking the abortion debate has once again challenged the very fiber of my love for democracy. I support fully all forms of non-violent civil protest and although I disagree strongly with the outspoken protesters against Obama’s appearance in the Notre Dame forum I still believe that their freedom of speech must be protected from government infringement.

My personal challenge comes from another source. My challenge is being respectful and civil toward individuals who use fear-tactics, propaganda, outright lies, and uncivil attitudes as a basis and standard in their public discourse. I believe in strongly denouncing falsehoods and misrepresentations of American society and Americans themselves, as well as calling out by name those who commit these travesties of democracy.

There is a mounting temptation to degrade myself to this level of uncivil debate and partisan attacks in place of any logical arguments.

The majority of modern anti-abortion movements use deplorable tactics and needless slander to enforce their own moral superiority” and unchallengeable righteousness.” This ultimately distracts from the public policy debate over women’s reproductive health and government involvement in the womb.

I am all for having the debate and going through the issue, piece by piece. However, it is my perception that the opposition is not interested in debate but rather denouncement of all positions contrary to their own as “immoral.”

This is fundamentally counter-productive to the process of democracy. I cannot claim to be free of partisan fervor and personally reject the label “Pro-Life,” and replace it with “Anti-Choice.”

This is just one example of many in which I fail in my duties as a citizen.

It is the express burden, and thus challenge, of the citizenry of a democracy to not only stay informed but to conduct themselves in a manner befitting to civil public debate.

Aside from what I view as hypocrisy of conservatives in supporting human rights only as exclusive to the womb but not in other cases of injustices against human rights. There is a clear and unanswered call for a logical, civil argument not based in religious view from which to form the argument in favor of outlawing abortion.

Waterboarding is Torture

It disturbs and disgusts me that so many American conservatives refuse to address all empirical evidence regarding practices like waterboarding while supporting these failed and immoral policies enacted under the Bush Presidency in the aftermath of the attacks of 2001.

Political partisanship aside, our nation has long stood as a global role model of a free republic and a just democracy by which the policies of fledgling democracies might observe and hopefully mimic.

A country claiming moral superiority must have reflective policies as pertaining to these morals. Any country that approves of a policy such as legal waterboarding of detainees cannot hope to claim any degree of civic morality inherent to it’s soil.

Redefinitions of torture as acceptable in any form is counter-intuitive to sound American policy making, in my view. Within political debate the same attempts are contrary to the Spirit of The Constitution itself. Not to mention the practice is specifically banned by the Military Code of Conduct and the Geneva Convention.